Due to the sheer volume of out of stocks we’ve seen on shelves in the last few weeks across several supermarkets, we’ve decided to focus on how FMCG sales people can reduce out of stocks of their brands at their customers’ stores.

Breakfast category

This is a common sight at most grocery stores now. Popular brands and flavours out of stock on shelves and in retailer warehouses. And when customers switch brands as a result, this is highly likely to result in loss of share. How can this be prevented? Keep the consumer in mind when discussing orders with buyers. What are your consumers doing now? How do you/your family eat breakfast now? On the go or at home? How can this impact sales of your brand and should you be discussing larger orders as a result?

Milk alternatives, sugar & sweeteners

These are the shelves you never expect to see low on stock (except during panic buying) in the normal course of events. We take it for granted that your local store always has milk/milk alternatives, sugar and honey. However, since consumer habits underwent a radical change during the pandemic, more people make coffee/tea/their beverage of choice at home now instead of making/buying at work or on the go. This has driven a higher rate of sale of this category. Sales people working for brands within this category should take into account how many of these out of home consumption occasions have been replaced by at-home consumption. And their brands share of those occasions.

Condiments & Carbs

These are photographs from 3 different stores. You may wonder if these are stock photographs from 2020, but these were from different supermarkets just this last weekend (8/9 May). While some of you may attribute some of this to Brexit (Olive Oil & Pasta), the rice, frying oil and Asian condiments are not imported or packaged in the EU and so Brexit should not have an impact. When selling brands/SKUs in this category to customers, consider how consumers have been eating during the pandemic. Are they expected to continue this behaviour or will lockdowns easing have an impact?

Confectionery & snacks

Confectionery and snacks have seen varying impacts during the past year. While brands in the mint and gum category have seen a drop in demand, the remainder of the category has seen a significant rise party due to stress eating and partly due to substituting holidays for treats. As lockdowns ease this is the one category that is likely to see a swing in demand. Consider consumer motivations and drivers for this category when discussing orders. More social occasions = more mint/gum sales. More social occasions = drop in sales of snacks as well. However, home/office working also has a significant impact on sales of snacks. The quantum of change for each brand depends on the brands, their consumption occasions and how many industries/companies decide on a return to work vs continuing remote work.

Beverages

Non-alcoholic & alcoholic beverage brands have experienced stock outs over the past few weeks/months. While some of this may be attributable to supply chain constraints around aluminium cans, why are the same products in bottles not available in greater quantity? Why not use the empty space for the same brand in other formats/packaging? For brands not constrained by this, why limit sales to pre-pandemic levels? Consider how your target consumer has changed his/her way of consumption over the past year and how likely it is to change.

The pandemic has forced us all to behave and consume products differently over the past year. This has now become a habit and habits do not change easily. So if you are a sales person selling FMCG products that are not in any of the above, think of the impact of the last year on the brand/product. Has the consumption occasion changed? If so, how has it changed? For example, consumers buy and use more cleaning products and personal hygiene products now than they did before the pandemic. This is now an ingrained consumer behaviour that is unlikely to change in the medium term.

Not unless there is another significant event that forces us to behave differently.

Published by Veena Giridhar Gopal

After more than 20 years working in the FMCG/retail sector, Veena is now co-founder & CEO of salesBeat. salesBeat has an AI driven platform that uses micro and macro factors to model consumer buying behaviour and makes predictive recommendations of optimal stock levels to FMCG sales people who sell into supermarkets, distributors & wholesalers, ensuring 100% availability of your brands in store and increasing revenues by up to 30%.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *