Personalisation at scale – L’Oreal

When a billion people use your skin care & hair care products and your cosmetics range, you need to consider innumerable textures & colours. All these consumers want products that are tailored to their needs. For L’Oreal, delivering personalisation at this level of scale meant thinking about innovation in a different way.

It would no longer mean a one solution to one problem approach. It meant tailoring the solution for individual consumers who experienced the same problem in different ways.

Leveraging industry 4.0 to achieve personalisation at scale

Industry 4.0 includes robotics, IoT, data, blockchain, VR, AR & AI. All these technologies have a place in the modern industrial framework. They can be combined and can be deployed to make manufacturing more productive and efficient.

L’Oréal not only leveraged e-commerce and recommendation engines during the pandemic, but the company also tested and implemented technologies to deliver personalisation at scale.

Initiatives and solutions

We’ve already covered L’Oreal’s Modiface in a previous blog. Some of L’Oreal’s other various initiatives are:

  • Le Teint Particulier, under the brand Lancome – a product which allows consumers to have their skin tone ‘measured’ at point of sale. A personalised concealer is then manufactured for them right there in the store. The concealer is a combination of one of each of 8,000 shades, 3 coverage levels, and 3 hydration levels. Even the packaging is personalised with information including the customer’s name. It also includes a reference ID for quick and easy reordering.
  • Custom D.O.S.E by Skinceuticals, a L’Oreal UK brand. According to L’Oreal’s tech incubator, “Custom D.O.S.E by SkinCeuticals is the first ever automated system that delivers highly concentrated combinations of SkinCeuticals’ most potent ingredients on-the-spot. Addressing the concerns of over 250 skin types, the D.O.S.E technology is first-of-its-kind because it’s able to mix active ingredients into a single serum at the point of service specifically to target the appearance of skin aging issues, like wrinkles, fine lines, and discoloration.”
  • Agile production lines – by leveraging several industry 4.0 technologies, L’Oreal has been able to manage final product differentiation later in the value chain. Stéphane Lannuzel says, “We can produce the base and then choose the colour for a lipstick right at the very last moment”.
  • Perso, this gadget personalises and customises make up for your every need. Perso relies on an AI derived diagnosis of a photo (corresponding phone app by BreezoMeter) of a user’s face to highlight imperfections ranging from fine lines to dryness. Perso then creates a final product formulated for the user’s skin, pulling from a library of ingredients.

The results speak for themselves

For the year ended 31 December 2021, L’Oreal’s brands grew by 16.1%, nearly twice that of the global beauty market. Sales was up 15.3% vs prior year, with profits up 29% vs prior year.

The group reported double digit sales growth in H1 2022 at 20.9% increase YoY.

Climate change and FMCG sales

Climate change in the form of extreme heat, hurricanes, flooding etc. presents an inherent risk to FMCG companies. It disrupts raw material supply and logistics (roads buckling, flights unable to take off and ships tossed about), resulting in price increases.

British Retail Consortium and NAACDs published studies that establish that every one degree change in temperature results in a 1% fluctuation of sales. However, companies and retailers are still not prepared for this.

The recent heatwaves in Europe and the resulting out of stocks and overstocking of certain SKUs at stores, are proof that inventory management technology has not yet caught up with the problems of today. So how exactly does climate change impact demand?

Obvious examples of climate change impacting sales

Ice-Creams, beer, white wine, rosé wine, chilled carbonated beverages, barbecue ingredients and products, picnic food, sunblock and sunscreen are the obvious ones that retailers stock up on when there is a heatwave.

According to Majestic Wine in the UK, during this last heatwave in July, Rosé outsold white and red wines by more than 172,000 bottles in that week alone. One bottle of Rosé wine was sold every 12 seconds!

Research firm Kantar said, ‘Sun care sales were up 66% and ice cream 14% in the four weeks to 10 July’.

During cold waves, pasta, pasta sauces, soups, baking ingredients, red wine, spirits, lotions for dry skin, flu medications etc experience increased demand.

Regions at risk of experiencing tornadoes, cyclones, hurricanes or storms, or where there are flood warnings in place, are likely to see increased demand for basic necessities like tinned & frozen food (incl. vegetables), packaged soup & pasta mixes, toilet paper, soaps, shampoo and household cleaning products.

Some not so obvious ones

However, there are a few not so obvious SKUs that experience increased demand as a result of unseasonal weather. The impact is not immediately seen and so maybe masked by other factors.

For example when both temperatures and humidity levels are high, there is a delayed increase in demand for anti mould & anti fungal products, shampoos, body soaps, conditioners, anti frizz hair products etc as consumers use more of these up at home during this time.

Another not so obvious one is a (delayed) increase in demand for allergy medications following a period when the weather is hot and humidity levels are low. Pollen count and dust levels impact demand of this product too.

Planning for unseasonal temperatures and weather events

While inventory teams and FMCG sales people may be making plans for barbecues and outdoor picnics when these heatwaves hit, several times, they do not translate this into their work lives.

And, when they do, they need to make guesstimates of the right levels of stock of these products at stores. This is because their demand planning system is unlikely to have taken this heatwave (or cold wave/other weather event) into account.

However, you know what you do as a consumer. It is not a stretch of the imagination to assume others are likely to do the same. Use this knowledge to help prepare your supermarket/FMCG company to ensure there is enough stock of impacted SKU to meet demand/delayed demand.

Follow the weather and ensure you do not order too much of one SKU assuming seasonality still holds. An example is ordering a container load of red wine in December assuming robust Christmas sales, when warmer, unseasonal temperatures are expected for Christmas.

Also, check out our blog on how you can anticipate changes in demand in a VUCA world.

If you have any questions or would like more information on how you can better prepare for demand changes driven by climate change, contact me on veena@salesbeat.co



Benefit Cosmetics and how they leveraged NFTs to increase consumer engagement & sales

The term NFTs (these days) is commonly associated with art these days. According to The Verge, NFTs can really be anything digital (such as drawings, music, your brain downloaded and turned into an AI), but a lot of the current excitement is around using the tech to sell digital art.
However, this is not about art, today our blog is about how Benefit Cosmetics leveraged NFTs to increase consumer engagement and sales during the pandemic by building a bespoke Virtual Atoms (a form of NFTs) powered platform.

Launch amidst lockdowns

When the UK announced nationwide lockdowns in 2020 and early 2021, Benefit Cosmetics needed a way to engage their consumers and encourage sales to mitigate closure of their stores and concession stands. Lockdowns were hard enough on sales of cosmetics, but even harder on launches of new products in cosmetics, skin care and hair care. And this was exactly the challenge Benefit Cosmetics needed to overcome. They had a new mascara product to launch when lockdowns hit. The new product being launched was They’re Real! Magnet Extreme Lengthening Mascara. The company needed a way to launch the product, reach their target consumers (‘BeneBabes’) and drive conversion.

A new way to reach their target

They needed a new approach to their sales strategy and the new consumer engagement platform needed to appeal to a jaded and frustrated audience who were now bombarded with Facebook & Instagram ads. Benefit Cosmetics describes its target consumer as ‘committed to the brand and active in social media interactions’. This meant that any ads or campaigns on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter or TikTok, would be just another ad to the target Benefit consumer. They needed a way to get their attention.

To do this we used a pioneering new technology, Virtual Atoms (VA) – a form of NFTs, to create a ‘lashtastic’ virtual-media campaign with real-life results.

Virtual Atoms (VA)

Benefit Cosmetics used a new technology, Virtual Atoms (VA), to create a virtual media platform and campaign to reach and wow their consumers. The VA campaign was multi channel and gave ‘BeneBabes’ a full 360degree experience if they so wished. Ads on social media encouraged fans and potential consumers to sign up to the VA platform. The platform engaged its users through virtual and real life experiences that had gamification at their core and drove them to buy the new magic mascara.

Users were asked to drop a pin to share their location. Then using AR, registered consumers used their device camera to view and collect ‘surprises’ they could see around them within the safety of their home/wherever they were then.

The surprises, Virtual Atoms, were stored in their Virtual Atoms’ wallet and could be redeemed to ‘spin the wheel’ and win prizes such as virtual beauty consultations, mascaras and product discounts. Winners were then redirected to their virtual store where they could collect their prizes and also buy product.

The platform also housed exclusive content from well known beauty influencers and promoted the campaign with nearly 1.4million followers on Instagram.

The results

Through the innovative use of NFTs and Virtual reality, Benefit Cosmetics created an omni-channel campaign that was fun for its target consumers and also delivered results. The campaign delivered a conversion rate of 55.4% vs a target of 46% and a click through rate (from registration to the platform) of 39.4% vs a target of 35%. The average dwell time was 2 minutes and 22 second, 29,870 new BeneBabes registered and 16,534 prizes were collected.


Not only was invaluable data captured through this campaign, but the platform helped Benefit Cosmetics connect with new and existing target consumers during a time when other companies struggled to do so.